Fall 2009

Read the full magazine (PDF).

Featured articles:

  • Building the Infrastructure: As Korean society modernizes, social work finds its place and social work education continues to grow.
  • A Longitudinal Study: Dodie Norton's 19-year record of a group of children growing up on Chicago's South Side has been a landmark in understanding how parental interaction impacts childhood development
  • Charting a New Course: With an ambitious mapping project, researchers are learning about health on the South Side and building a new community asset.
  • No Cost Care: Free clinics fill the gap in health care for the uninsured
  • Foreclosure Relief: How much is enough?
  • Staying Safe: To avoid sexual violence at college parties, women are careful - rather than demanding safety.
  • Access Denied: Service roadblocks without proper government ID.
  • Translating Transitions: At Children's Memorial Hospital, a variety of programs help patients and their families prepare for a longer life.
  • Behind the Numbers, Violence Shrouded: 55,000: Number of children and underage youth murdered in the U.S. since 1980. Why do so few youth turn to professional helpers like social workers after being exposed to violence?

View web-only content:

Baby Talk, Extended Conversations: Read the full conversations piece between SSA Samuel Deutsch Professor Sydney Hans and Karen Freel, vice president for research and evaluation for the Ounce of Prevention Fund as they discuss parenting, children, and early-childhood development.

Refugee Relief: Bruce Thao spent three months in 2009 in Thailand with RADION International, a local nongovernmental organization committed to helping Hmong-Thai villagers and Hmong-Lao refugees. It was an experience, he says, that "changed the way I think about everything..." 

Silvia Acosta

Silvia L. Acosta, AM '14

“I chose SSA because of its reputation as one of the top programs in the nation. I was attracted to the idea of being intellectually challenged by renowned faculty and classmates in discussionbased lectures. Additionally, I saw that the comprehensive curriculum offered a balanced approach, encompassing both macro and micro training in social work.”