PDP Summer 2018 Programs

The Professional Development Program at SSA is a licensed State of Illinois provider of continuing education for social workers, clinical psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors. License numbers: 159.000140; 168.000115; 268.000004. It is recommended that professionals review rules for their licensing board prior to registering for a workshop to ensure that the content meets their renewal requirements.

Delivering Trauma-Informed Care
Date: Friday, June 22, 2018 
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75
CEUs: 3
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Lauren Feldman

This workshop has reached capacity and registration is closed

Traumatic life events can have an intense physical, psychological and spiritual impact on the way we live our lives. Untreated trauma has the power to transform our personal narratives and the way we see our communities. That is why it is essential for clinicians to practice through a trauma-informed lens in any setting.

In this training, participants will develop language and tools to deliver trauma-informed care. We will also discuss the way that hope and resiliency can be its own intervention in helping clients heal from trauma. In the second part of this training, we will shift our focus to the impact of trauma work on the clinician. We will also consider new methods of self-care aimed specifically at lifting vicarious trauma. 

Learning Objectives:

  • To become familiar with different types of traumatic life events and how to intervene in each category
  • To learn the three pillars of trauma-informed practice (establishing safety, setting safe boundaries, and creating consolidation)
  • To utilize a client’s risk factors and protective factors as interventions in trauma-informed care
  • To consider hope and resiliency as interventions in the treatment of trauma
  • To become  familiar with somatic empathy and its relationship to vicarious trauma
  • To adopt new practices around self-care

The Transition from Clinician to Manager
Dates: Thursday, June 28 - Friday, June 29, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $280
CEUs: 12
Location: 10 E Grand Avenue, Chicago

Instructor: Arnie Aronoff

Registration Deadline Extended: Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Clinicians and social workers are increasingly asked to assume managerial roles based on outstanding clinical expertise and performance.  Sometimes, these clinicians are prepared to take on this new challenge.  Many times, however, management training has not been an extensive part of their academic preparation or prior work experience.  They wonder whether transitioning into management would be a sound idea, what challenges they will face in making this transition, and what skills they will need to demonstrate to meet new expectations.  This two-day experiential workshop addresses these and other issues.

On day one, we will help you assess your existing strengths and weaknesses so that you can identify the skill- and personality-based challenges you might face in a managerial role.  We will contrast the core competencies of clinical social workers with those of management.  We will help you understand what it means to supervise, manage, and lead others, what supervision does and does not entail, and the differences between managing clinicians and non-clinicians.  

Day two focuses on the set of relationships a new manager must forge:  supervisory relationships with individuals with whom they previously had peer-to-peer connections; relationships with a new peer group of lateral managers; and relationship building with a new boss.  We will discuss how to advocate for program development and change in your larger organization.  We conclude day two by focusing on the importance of self-care in this transition and on the pros and cons of choosing a management career versus making other career choices.

By the conclusion of this two-day workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Describe their existing skill- and personality-based strengths and weaknesses;
  • Connect this self-analysis to the challenges of being a supervisor, manager, and leader;
  • Understand the core competencies and responsibilities of being a manager;
  • Create plans for managing the performance of new direct reports and for building relationships with a new boss and a new set of colleagues; and
  • Create a plan for advocating and communicating what they do to a wider organizational audience.

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Pathways to Solutions with Self-Destructive Adolescents: A Collaborative, Strengths-Based Therapy Approach
Date: Friday, June 29, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 10 E Grand Avenue, Chicago

Instructor: Matthew Selekman

Registration Deadline Extended: Wednesday, June 27, 2018

In today’s environment of economic upheaval, high stress, and digital overload, practitioners are increasingly seeing adolescents present with multiple self-destructive behaviors such as self-injury combined with substance abuse, eating disorders, and excessive video-gaming and Internet use. However, since these behaviors are emotionally and physically rewarding, adolescents will protect these habits at all costs—making it difficult to engage and retain them in treatment. To complicate matters, these high-risk youth typically attract helping professionals from a variety of systems who may not regularly communicate with one another, nor agree on the best treatment options to pursue. Consequently, the family may have difficulty knowing which way to proceed, further perpetuating the adolescent’s difficulties.

This workshop will emphasize a collaborative approach that harnesses the strengths and resources of adolescents, their family members, peers and other key resource people from their social networks, and helping professionals to co-generate high quality solutions together. The use of this treatment approach in schools and more restrictive settings will be covered. The instructor will present information on recent research and effective therapeutic tools and strategies for adolescents with self-destructive behaviors, and employ the use of videotape examples, and skill-building exercises.

As a result of attending this “hands-on” practice-oriented workshop, you will be able to:

  • Tailor-fit and match the therapeutic relationship to the unique needs and characteristics of self-destructive adolescents and involved family members
  • Select and construct therapeutic questions that tap client expertise, help formulate realistic treatment goals, and help clients to achieve abstinence from their choice self-destructive habits
  • Select and apply mindfulness meditations and other distress management tools and strategies to help adolescents quiet their minds and achieve inner peace
  • Select, design, and implement therapeutic interventions that strengthen and improve parental-adolescent relationships
  • Select and  apply effective relapse prevention tools and strategies
  • Establish successful collaborative relationships with involved helping professionals and key resource people from the adolescent’s social network

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Treating Co-Occurring Disorders
Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 3500 Midwest Road, Oak Brook

Instructor: Mark Sanders

THIS WORKSHOP WILL BE RESCHEDULED TO FALL 2018. PLEASE CONTACT OUR OFFICE TO INDICATE YOUR INTEREST AT pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu 

Addictions and mental illness overlap at the rate of 50 percent. Compared to clients with a single diagnosis, those with co-occurring disorders experience more evictions, arrests, hospitalizations, suicide attempts, and actual suicides. In this interactive, skill-building workshop, participants will be introduced to strategies that will enable them to work more effectively with clients with co-occurring disorders.

A partial list of topics includes: Rapport Building with Clients with Co-occurring Disorders; Overcoming Challenges in Making Diagnoses and Misdiagnoses;  5 Common Hidden Psychiatric Disorders; The New Person-centered Approach to Addictions, Mental Health, and Co-occurring Disorders Recovery; Evidence-based Approaches to Co-occurring Disorders Treatment; The Effective Use of Peers; Strategies for Increasing Medication Compliance; and Providing the 4 Essentials in Order to Increase Recovery Rates.

By the end of this workshop, participants will:

  • Be aware of 5 hidden psychiatric disorders that, if unaddressed, can impact recovery
  • Be aware of the 10 tenets of the person-centered recovery approach
  • Be aware of 4 evidence-based approaches to co-occurring disorders treatment
  • Be aware of how peers can be instrumental in impacting recovery
  • Be aware of 4 steps for increasing medication compliance
  • Be aware of research on the 4 essentials that are helpful in increasing co-occurring disorders recovery rates

Credits for CADC-licensed professionals applied through Illinois Certification Board.

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Understanding Dying, Death, and End-of-Life Care
Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 3500 Midwest Road, Oak Brook

Instructor: Amy Schigelone

Registration Deadline: Friday July 6, 2018

Death is a universal human experience relevant to all areas of social work practice, but in our death-denying and defying culture it is one that is often met with fear and discomfort by both patient and practitioner.  A main goal of this engaging workshop is to cultivate greater familiarity with death and dying so that this inevitable occurrence can be empathically embraced instead of avoided. 

Participants will develop a better understanding of the dying experience for patients and their families. The often misunderstood hospice and palliative care programs and benefits will be explained.  Participants will also be exposed to effective communication strategies around end of life preferences and gain practical skills in completing advance directives. The role of social work in this inherently multi-disciplinary field will be discussed, with a focus on the importance of adopting a non-judgmental, patient-centered stance, and accepting and appreciating the variation found in end-of-life experiences. Strategies for dealing with the fear of death and interventions for working with the dying will be introduced. In addition, participants will be encouraged to develop self-awareness of their own values and beliefs toward dying and death, and explore strategies for self-care.

By the end of this workshop, participants will:

  • Recognize current attitudes and approaches to death in the United States 
  • Distinguish between hospice and palliative care programs and benefits, and when they may be appropriate
  • Understand the dying experience for the terminally ill and their loved ones
  • Identify the role of social work in end of life care
  • Develop an appreciation and acceptance of the variation found in end of life experiences
  • Know advance planning options and be able to utilize them with individuals and their families
  • Utilize effective communication techniques in working with individuals around end of life issues
  • Become aware of strategies and interventions for working with the fear of death and the dying
  • Appreciate the need for an awareness of one’s own attitudes around end of life issues and effective self-care

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Engendering Inclusion: Providing Affirming Services to Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adults
Date: Friday, July 13, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Aren Drehobl

THIS WORKSHOP IS AT CAPACITY. EMAIL OUR OFFICE TO BE PLACED ON A WAITLIST: pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Transgender and gender nonconforming people have existed throughout history.  In recent years, however, dramatically increased visibility and growing social acceptance have led more transgender people than ever to openly discuss their identities, experiences, and needs.  Even clinicians with extensive experience working with gender diversity have difficulty keeping up with rapidly evolving terminology, thinking about best practices, and available resources.  This workshop will cover these topics and others to help participants provide truly affirming services to transgender and gender nonconforming adults.

The workshop format will include a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential exercises, and clinical consultation to help participants increase both their knowledge and their concrete skills in providing gender-affirming care.  

Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Comfortably use inclusive terminology and gender neutral language
  • Identify common presenting issues and contemporary practice models
  • Assess and improve the level of gender-inclusivity of their current practice

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois Cultural Competence requirement for social workers.

The Ethics of Caregiving in an Increasingly Complex Health System
Date: Friday, July 13, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6 
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Gary Gilles

THIS WORKSHOP IS AT CAPACITY. EMAIL OUR OFFICE TO BE PLACED ON A WAITLIST: pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Approximately one in three families in the U.S. cares for an aging, disabled or chronically ill family member. The percentage of families caring for a loved one is expected to increase dramatically over the next decade due to many anticipated changes in our healthcare system and federal entitlement programs. 

The ethics surrounding caregiving challenges some of our deepest beliefs about family, the sanctity of life, dignity of personhood, and death. This workshop takes a close look at some of the most important ethical issues related to caregiving from the perspective of family members and professionals caring for these individuals. Special emphasis will be made to apply the discussion of ethical concerns in the workshop to practical caregiving topics through case studies and personal exploration of participant’s values. 

Course objectives:

  • Explore common assumptions and challenges associated with caregiving
  • Discuss the shifting financial concerns around caregiving
  • Examine the importance of self-identifying as a caregiver
  • Differentiate between the healthcare culture and the family culture
  • Discuss ways an individual’s worth is measured in the healthcare system
  • Examine the role of social care in caregiving
  • Evaluate the intersection between caregiving and end-of-life issues

This workshop satisfies the state of Illinois Ethics requirement for clinical psychologists and social workers.

Social Work License: Preparation Review Course
Dates: Friday, July 20 & Saturday, July 21, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $260* 
CEUs: 12
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Sophia F. Dziegielewski

Registration Deadline: Sunday, July 15, 2018

This comprehensive course covers test-taking strategies and relevant clinical content in order to prepare for the social worker or clinical social worker exams. Course materials are updated for new DSM-5™ content and will cover topics such as: test-taking strategies; social work values and ethics (three hours to satisfy the State of Illinois ethics CE requirement for social workers); human growth and development issues; assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies; models and methods of social work practice; and clinical supervision.

Course Objectives:

Overview of test construction and test-taking strategies

  • Identify how to break down questions and identify key words

  • Practice how to take social work practice information and address it in a standardized format)

Social work values and ethics

    • Recite and synthesize the dynamics of abuse and neglect

    • Review and interpret the NASW Code of Ethics

Human growth and development issues

    • Summarize major theoretical approaches to understanding human development with individuals, groups, and families

    • Sketch the theories and stages of normal psychosocial, cognitive, moral, and behavioral development in the life cycle of individuals, families and groups

Assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies

    • Identify and interpret psychosocial history and collateral data, and how it relates in the social work practice setting

    • Assess client problems along with behavioral/psychosocial strengths and weaknesses

    • Identify diagnosis, assessment and practice intervention utilizing the DSM-5

    • Define the components of intervention strategies with individuals, groups, families and communities

    • Identify factors in the therapeutic relationship that facilitate building and retaining relationships

Models and methods of social work practice

    • Recognize the major theoretical approaches, models and methods of practice in the social work profession

    • Cite the different types of research designs utilized in social work practice

    • Translate the most common policies and procedures that govern service delivery

Clinical supervision

    • Restate the roles and functions related to professional supervision and educational expectations

This course consistently fills to capacity. Early registration is encouraged.

*Tuition includes review course manual with sample test questions and related materials, as well as the opportunity to contact the instructor with questions following the course.

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Eating Disorders: Beyond the Symptoms
Date: Monday, July 23, 2018
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75
CEUs: 3
Location: 933 Skokie Boulevard, Northbrook

Instructor: Jancey Wickstrom

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Eating disorders are mental illnesses that are notoriously difficult to treat. The intersection of emotional and physical symptomology presents a unique challenge for even the most experienced clinician. 

This workshop will provide participants with current diagnostic criteria, research findings from evidence-based treatments, and information on effectively matching levels of care to the degree of patients’ psychological and medical severity. Using the transdiagnostic Unified Treatment Model, clinicians will learn how to best help clients engage with the recovery process in order to make sustainable change. 

Through the use of didactic and experiential modalities as well as small group work, participants will leave this workshop more confident in their skills to help individuals who suffer from this complex disorder.

Topics will include:

  • Diagnostic changes in DSM-5

  • Anorexia

  • Bulimia and BED

  • ARFID

  • Diabulimia/Orthorexia

  • Evidence-based treatment for eating disorders: 

      Family-based treatment

      Unified Protocol

      ACT/DBT

  • Implementing evidence-based treatment in your practice

  • Group work and role plays

  • Levels of care and when to refer out to higher level of care

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Trust and Commitment in Relationships
Date: Monday, July 23, 2018
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75
CEUs: 3
Location: 933 Skokie Boulevard, Northbrook

Instructor: Michael McNulty

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Treating infidelity due to affairs can be challenging for the most skilled clinician. This workshop describes an overview of research on infidelity and contemporary models of recovery from affairs, such as the late Dr. Shirley Glass’ model outlined in the book, “Not Just Friends” and the late Dr. Caryl Rusbult Investment Model.  

It will include the results of Dr. John Gottman’s trust research and the “Atone, Attune, Attach” model of affair recovery he developed with his partner Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman. The instructor will provide a case example to illustrate how he uses the Gottman model as an evidenced-based component to support his self psychological approach to couple therapy.

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Reconstructing the Social Work Interview
Date: Wednesday, July 25, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: E. Summerson Carr

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Social work has historically distinguished itself by its interest in the person-in-environment.  How do our approaches to interviewing clients—whether during clinical assessments or program intakes—enact this central professional ideal?

This workshop will expose participants to a linguistic anthropological method of conducting and analyzing interviews with specific reference to the kinds of interviews conducted in the course of social work practice.  Linguistic anthropology is a field that systematically considers language use in and across social contexts.  Linguistic anthropological methods are therefore particularly well equipped to interpret the various ways “environment” manifests in interviews with individual clients. 

The first half of the day will focus on the practical dynamics and structural constraints of common approaches to social work interviewing. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the interview approaches they use in their own practice, with particular attention to their respective yields and limits.

The second part of the day will be devoted to learning a systematic and holistic approach to analyzing clinical interview data, with the goal of understanding a) people in environment and b) environment in people.   

This workshop will be of particular interest to social workers and other professionals who conduct assessments, program intakes, or other kinds of interviews with clients, as well as supervisors and administrators who are responsible for formulating interview protocols and procedures. 

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From Microaggressions to Acts of Hate: Protecting Marginalized Individuals and Communities While Challenging Racism
Date: Friday, July 27, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Krista Woods

THIS WORKSHOP IS AT CAPACITY. EMAIL OUR OFFICE TO BE PLACED ON A WAITLIST: pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Many of our clients, communities we work in and with, and even our colleagues and ourselves who are racial minorities or identify as being members of minority groups, (ie: LGBTQ, Muslim, Jewish, persons living with disabilities, immigrants and persons with undocumented legal status) have always faced microaggressions, or indirect discrimination.  However, since the election in 2016, there has been a sharp increase in direct acts of hate toward the same individuals and groups. 

This workshop will explore how this shift impacts our clients; and changes how we provide services to ensure that we are not only protecting those impacted, but challenging oppression as called to do in the tenets, principles, and code of ethics as social workers. The workshop is designed to teach how each of us can help support and be active participants and allies to groups that are targets of hate and being further oppressed in our current society.  Participants will learn actual steps and activities that you can do to help, and how you can identify your privilege and that of your organization to help not only support others but dismantle oppressive and discriminatory systems. This interactive workshop will include individual and group activities. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn what have historically been overt and indirect acts of oppression and discrimination impacting our clients (microaggressions, microinvalidations and microinsults)
  • Participants will learn how most (if not all) of our clients we work with in various systems were impacted before the election
  • We will discuss in general why we are seeing this change from microaggressions to direct acts of hate; along with examples of recent incidences that have occurred in the Midwest
  • Participants will learn how we can help support individual and organizational changes to ensure that clients are protected and supported
  • Participants will learn the importance of preserving positive changes made for the sake of clients, colleagues and ourselves

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois Cultural Competence requirement for social workers.

Juvenile Law for Mental Health Professionals
Date: Friday, July 27, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Helene Snyder

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Illinois juvenile law regarding child maltreatment is a complex composite of statutes, court decisions, and administrative regulations.  A case may be initiated in the Juvenile Court, Domestic Relations Court, or in a DCFS administrative proceeding. Or, more than one case may be simultaneously initiated judicially and administratively. 

This workshop will analyze the processes by which cases are referred to courts and to administrative proceedings, and review the outcomes that may result from such referrals.         

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Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.