Course Number: 
46922

In 2012 there were over 45.2 million people forcibly displaced from their homes around the world, the highest number since 1994. Over 15 million registered refugees were among those displaced, and of these just 89,000 were admitted to third countries for permanent resettlement. Worldwide the United States is by far the largest resettlement country, in 2012 the U.S resettled 58,000 refugees. With so many vulnerable people in the world, and so few options for their safe resettlement, there is a risk that entry to the U.S. can be seen as an end in and of itself. What is more, refugees in the U.S. get a relative leg up over their immigrant counterparts, refugees are entitled to an array of federal, state, and local supports that other immigrants in the U.S. must do without. At the same time, refugees in the U.S. are arguably subject to greater scrutiny and systems of social control than any other domestic population. This course asks the central question, how does the system of refugee resettlement operate in the U.S., and with what implications for refugees? We will begin by detangling the web of international and domestic policies that relate to the refugees' political identity, and then focus in on the U.S. system of resettlement. We will analyze the structure of resettlement policy and explore its implications for social work practice with this population with special attention to issues such as employment, mental health, child and youth development, and aging. Finally we will identify various ways that social workers can support this population as they navigate their entry to the United States.