Beulah Compton, PhD’71, (Deceased)

1991 Recipient of the Edith Abbott Award

Past Award Winners

The following is taken from the Spring 1991 issue of SSA Magazine.

Beulah ComptonBeulah R. Compton, professor and director of the School of Social Work at the University of Southern Mississippi, has been named the 1991 recipient of the Edith Abbott Alumni Award. This annual award is given to SSA alumni for distinguished service to society or for outstanding professional contributions at the local, national, or international levels.

Compton helped to initiate the first graduate school of social work in Mississippi in 1976 and returned to the School in 1990 as director. She is a professor emeritus at the Alabama School of Social Work, where she served as director of the doctoral program. Compton is also professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota, and has served both as associate dean and acting dean of the School of Social Work at Indiana University. She has taught numerous workshops and short-term courses at other schools of social work, including SSA.

Compton has held a variety of social work positions and has served as a case consultant to family service agencies. Her primary interests are in child welfare protective services, correction, family therapy, and social work education, particularly field instruction. She has published extensively and is the author of two books: Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work and Social Work Process, which she wrote with Burt Galaway. She is presently completing a manuscript about theories of clinical social work.

Compton received a B.A. from Illinois Wesleyan University, a B.Ed. from Illinois State University, a M.A.S.W. from Indiana University, and a Ph.D. from SSA. She was awarded an honorary doctorate of laws from Illinois Wesleyan University.

Max Beshers

Max Beshers, AM '14

“I’ve learned that research is a lot of work and it takes a long time to do. From the protocol, to developing instruments, to recruiting participants. This has been a real eye-opener. But all of this hard work [for Project READY] is gratifying as this research is important. It will help inform those of us who are clinicians. And it’s going to save lives.”